Personal Finance

Checking Your Credit Report And Correcting Information

A man checks his credit report on his tablet

The UK Credit Score Guide 2018
Chapter Five

Story Highlights:

Would you believe that 15 million Britons have never asked to see a copy of their credit report? Many only do so when there’s a problem. For instance, they find themselves turned down for a credit agreement or loan and wonder why. This article highlights the importance of checking and correcting your credit report with information about:

  • Why you should check your credit file
  • When you should check your credit report
  • What to do about errors on your credit file
  • When to use a ‘Notice of Correction’
  • When to use a ‘Notice of Disassociation’

In this article, we explain the importance of regularly checking your credit file and explain how this can be done. We also tell you what you should do if you find errors which might have a direct effect on the credit rating you’re given. Finally, what’s a Notice of Correction and a Notice of Disassociation and under what circumstances would you need to add one of these to your credit file?



Why should you check your credit file?

It’s absolutely crucial that you check your credit report regularly. Financial agreements you don’t know about can often be the first indication that you’ve become a victim of identity theft. The sooner you realise, the easier it is to get the problem rectified and the less damage done.

Financial agreements you don’t know about can often be the first indication that you’ve become a victim of identity theft.

Another reason why checking your credit report is a good idea is that you can check for mistakes. No organisation is infallible and clerical errors are sometimes made. It could be someone with the same name as you that leads to doubts over your creditworthiness. Or maybe you’ve been in dispute with a creditor about a payment. If left on your file, it can give lenders a mistaken image of what type of borrower you are and your reliability.

When should you check your credit report?

Checking your credit report is vital before applying for new lines of credit and is imperative before a substantial financial commitment such as a mortgage or a business loan. If you’re turned down because of fraudulent credit applications or because of errors, it can be extremely damaging for you. You might have to put your personal and professional plans on hold until the matter’s sorted out.

A young couple are checking their credit report before making new substantial financial commitments

Having to re-apply can also have a domino effect on your credit rating. Too many searches on your credit report can make your credit score even worse as lenders get their impression that you’re desperate for money. This can count against you and lead to further rejections for credit.

What to do about errors on your credit report

Credit reference agencies aren’t always to blame if there are mistakes on file about your credit history. This could be a question of mistaken identity. If it’s someone with the same name as you, this is a relatively easy matter to investigate and modify.

However, if the information comes from a bank or building society with whom you do have a financial relationship, the credit reference agency isn’t permitted to alter the information until they’ve checked with the lender. Instead they will put a ‘Notice of Dispute’ on the entry until they’ve contacted the organisation which supplied the information. It’s very important that you’re able to give proof of why the entry is wrong such as supplying a copy of a receipt or a bank statement. Corrections are then made within 28 days.

A young woman on the phone with a lender who refuses to modify mistakes on her credit history

If lenders refuse to remove or modify mistakes, you can ask the ICO (Information Commissioner’s Office) to intervene. Only the FOS (Financial Ombudsman Service) has the power to award compensation for mistaken entries on your credit report which have financial consequences for you.

When to use a ‘Notice of Correction’

Sometimes there may be an entry on your credit file which you feel is misleading although it isn’t inaccurate. Perhaps there were extenuating circumstances for a late payment or you went through a period of financial difficulties because of ill health or redundancy.

In this case, you can add a ‘Notice of Correction’ to your file. In this document (of up to 200 words), you give factual information to explain the circumstances behind the entry. The key word is ‘factual’. If your account is considered to be defamatory (of a third party), frivolous or unsuitable, your account might be rejected. Some debt advisory agencies recommend that you avoid adding these notices. They argue that they can draw attention to missed payments or defaults and can be seen as excuses rather than justifications.

Too many searches on your credit  report can worsen your credit score

Although organisations must read notices of correction, they’re under no obligation to take your explanation into account before reaching a decision about whether to give you credit.

When to use a ‘Notice of Disassociation’

If you take out a financial product with someone else such as a joint bank account or a mortgage, then your credit reports become linked as ‘financial associates’. This is often the case when you share a house with someone and/or you’re in a relationship.



If you subsequently move or separate, it’s very important that you check your credit file and complete a Notice of Disassociation. In order to do so, you must prove that your finances are no longer linked in any way. For example, shared bank accounts have been closed. This is especially important if your former partner/housemate have a poor credit rating. If lenders are under the mistaken impression that your finances are still linked, you could be turned down for credit through no fault of your own.

Concluding words about checking your credit report

You should make a habit of checking your credit files at all the main credit reference agencies around twice a year. In this way, you’ll be able to nip problems in the bud before they affect your access to credit and how much borrowing costs you. You should definitely check your reports before applying for any new lines of credit. Doing so could save you a lot of time and hassle further down the line.


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About the author

Thomas Henderson

Thomas worked as a consultant in personal finance in the UK for 18 years. He has found a passion in sharing his experience on familymoney.co.uk

Thomas also takes pleasure in woodworking, reading and observing stock market trends.

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About The Author

Thomas Henderson

Thomas worked as a consultant in personal finance in the UK for 18 years. He has found a passion in sharing his experience on familymoney.co.uk

Thomas also takes pleasure in woodworking, reading and observing stock market trends.

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